Frequently asked questions

Binge Eating Disorder patients taking Vyvanse® ask questions about Vyvanse® and B.E.D.

Clare and Sandy, both diagnosed with moderate B.E.D., and treated with Vyvanse

Only a trained healthcare provider can diagnose moderate to severe Binge Eating Disoder (B.E.D.) in adults. But what else is there to know? 

Questions about Vyvanse® and Binge Eating Disorder

What is Binge Eating Disorder, or B.E.D.?

B.E.D. is a real medical condition. It’s the most common eating disorder in the US. In fact, more adults have B.E.D. than any other eating disorder, including anorexia and bulimia combined.* Continue learning about B.E.D.

*Based on a sample of 2,980 adults aged ≥18 years who were assessed for an eating disorder in a national survey.

How do you treat Binge Eating Disorder, or B.E.D.?

Only a doctor or other trained healthcare provider can diagnose B.E.D. and determine the appropriate treatment plan. Medication isn’t necessarily right for all adults with B.E.D., but in some cases, it may be used as part of a patient’s management plan. You can learn more about treatment here.

What causes Binge Eating Disorder, or B.E.D.?

The exact cause of B.E.D. is unknown. However, researchers believe specific brain chemicals, family history, and certain life experiences may play a role. Learn more about the potential causes of B.E.D.

What is considered binge eating?

When someone with B.E.D. binge eats, it's different from someone who occasionally overeats, like at a holiday meal. Not everyone who overeats has B.E.D. Learn more about B.E.D. here.

How do I support someone with Binge Eating Disorder, or B.E.D.?

Let your loved one know that you’re there for them and that you’re always willing to listen if they want to share. But, remember that B.E.D. is a real medical condition and that it can only be diagnosed and managed by a doctor or healthcare provider. So, as much as you want to help, you may not be the right person to provide guidance. Gently encourage your loved one to talk with his or her doctor and remind them that they are not alone. Explore resources for you and your loved one here.

What is Vyvanse?

In February 2015, Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine dimesylate) became the first and only medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat moderate to severe Binge Eating Disorder in adults. Vyvanse is not for weight loss. It is not known if Vyvanse is safe and effective for the treatment of obesity.

How does Vyvanse work for Binge Eating Disorder, or B.E.D.?

If you’re an adult and you’ve been diagnosed with moderate to severe B.E.D., your doctor may recommend medication as part of your management plan. Vyvanse is the first and only medication approved to treat moderate to severe Binge Eating Disorder (B.E.D.) in adults. Vyvanse is not for weight loss. It is not known if Vyvanse is safe and effective for the treatment of obesity. See how Vyvanse worked for study patients in short- and longer-term clinical trials.

Who should not take Vyvanse?

Do not take Vyvanse if you are taking or have taken within the past 14 days an anti-depressant called a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) or are sensitive to, allergic to, or had a reaction to other stimulant medications. Explore safety and side effect information for more safety information and warnings about Vyvanse.

Is Vyvanse addictive?

As with any medication, proper use is important. Vyvanse is a federally controlled substance (CII) because it can be abused or lead to dependence. Keep Vyvanse in a safe place to prevent misuse and abuse. Selling or giving away Vyvanse may harm others and is against the law. Talk to your doctor and read the safety information continued below and download our Proper Use of Prescription Stimulant Medication brochure for more information.

What is the recommended Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine dimesylate) dosage?

Vyvanse is a once-daily capsule that should be taken in the morning, with or without food.

Your doctor will determine the dose that is right for you. In clinical studies, adult patients with moderate to severe B.E.D. began treatment at 30 mg per day, and by week 4 were treated with 50 mg or a maximum dose of 70 mg per day. Your own treatment needs may be different.

It’s important to work with your doctor to find the dose that is right for you.

Next up?

See tips for talking with your doctor about B.E.D. and connect with support