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Why It's Important

Talk to the doctor to learn more about Binge Eating Disorder (B.E.D.). Only a doctor or other trained health care professional can diagnose B.E.D. and determine an appropriate treatment plan. Starting a discussion about any medical condition can be a very sensitive subject. Vyvanse is not right for all adults with moderate to severe B.E.D., so be open and direct with your doctor. Share how long you have experienced episodes of binge eating, in addition to other details about your binges.

Remember, Vyvanse is not for weight loss. It is not known if Vyvanse is safe and effective for the treatment of obesity.

binge eating disorder (B.E.D.) is a real medical condition

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Starting the Conversation

Making the decision to talk to your doctor about your binge eating is a courageous and very important first step in managing Binge Eating Disorder. Though you may feel uncomfortable discussing the subject of your eating binges, it’s important to remember that you are not the first and you are not alone. Other adults have already had this same conversation with their doctors.

When talking with your doctor about your binge eating episodes, it is important to describe your experiences. It may help to use language your doctor is already familiar with. Refer to the B.E.D. Symptom Checklist and tell your doctor if you’ve experienced any of these symptoms.

Be sure to give your doctor the most complete and most accurate information you can so that he or she can do what is best for you.

Here are some ideas to help you start the conversation with your doctor, and ways to be prepared for the questions he or she may ask you in return.

Keep an eating journal Keep an Eating Journal

Your doctor may ask questions about your eating habits and tendencies. By keeping a journal, you can readily keep track of your eating and how you felt before, during, and after any binge eating episodes.

This will provide your doctor with specific information related to your eating habits.

Be open with your doctor Be Open with Your Doctor

With the understanding that B.E.D. can be a very sensitive subject, try not to beat around the bush. Be open and honest with your doctor about your concerns related to your eating habits, and ask him or her to be equally open and honest with you as well.


Talking to your doctor

Be prepared to ask questions Be Prepared to Ask Questions

If you are concerned enough about B.E.D. to talk with your doctor, then you may have a lot of questions. Write them down in advance. When a question comes to mind, add it to your list. When it comes to your health, it is important to address your concerns with your doctor.  

And, remember, your doctor may not have all the answers since Binge Eating Disorder is newly recognized as a distinct medical condition. It may take time for your doctor to complete your evaluation and determine if B.E.D. is the cause for your binge eating episodes.

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Questions to Ask Your Doctor

The only way to know if you suffer from moderate to severe B.E.D., or if once-daily Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine dimesylate) might be right for you, is to talk to your doctor. Here are a few things to help you get ready. Remember, only your doctor or other trained health care professional can diagnose B.E.D.

Questions to ask your doctor about B.E.D.

  • What is Binge Eating Disorder?
  • What causes Binge Eating Disorder?
  • Why do I have such little control when I eat such large amounts so quickly? Why can’t I just stop?

Questions to ask about Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine dimesylate)

If you have been diagnosed with moderate to severe B.E.D., below are some questions you might want to ask your doctor about Vyvanse. As a reminder, Vyvanse is not for weight loss. It is not known if Vyvanse is safe and effective for the treatment of obesity.

  • How may Vyvanse help with my moderate to severe B.E.D. symptoms?
  • How do I know if Vyvanse is right for me?
  • Who should not take Vyvanse?
  • How will I know if Vyvanse is working?
  • Can I take Vyvanse with my other medications?
  • What important safety information should I know about Vyvanse?
  • What are the side effects of Vyvanse?
  • What time of day should Vyvanse be taken?
Vyvanse is not right for all adults with moderate to severe B.E.D., so be open and direct with your doctor. If prescribed, take Vyvanse exactly as your doctor tells you to take it.

Vyvanse is not for weight loss. It is not known if Vyvanse is safe and effective for the treatment of obesity.
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Important Safety Information about Vyvanse

 

 

Vyvanse® is a federally controlled substance (CII) because it can be abused or lead to dependence. Keep Vyvanse in a safe place to prevent misuse and abuse. Selling or giving away Vyvanse may harm others and is against the law.

Vyvanse is a stimulant medicine. Tell the doctor if you have ever abused or been dependent on alcohol, prescription medicines, or street drugs.

Who should not take Vyvanse?

Do not take Vyvanse if you are:

  • taking or have taken an anti-depression medicine called a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) within the past 14 days.
  • sensitive to, allergic to, or had a reaction to other stimulant medicines.

Problems that can occur while taking Vyvanse. Tell the doctor:

  • if you have heart problems or heart defects, high blood pressure, or a family history of these problems. This is important because sudden death has occurred in people with heart problems or defects taking stimulant medicines, and sudden death, stroke and heart attack have happened in adults taking stimulant medicines. Since increases in blood pressure and heart rate may occur, the doctor should regularly check these during treatment. Call the doctor right away if you have any signs of heart problems such as chest pain, shortness of breath, or fainting while taking Vyvanse.
  • if you have mental problems, or a family history of suicide, bipolar illness, or depression. This is important because new or worsening behavior and thought problems or bipolar illness may occur. New symptoms such as seeing or hearing things that are not real, believing things that are not true, being suspicious, or having new manic symptoms may occur. Call the doctor right away if there are any new or worsening mental symptoms during treatment.
  • if you have circulation problems in fingers and toes (peripheral vasculopathy, including Raynaud’s phenomenon). Fingers or toes may feel numb, cool, painful, sensitive to temperature and/or change color from pale, to blue, to red. Call the doctor right away if any signs of unexplained wounds appear on fingers or toes while taking Vyvanse.
  • if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Vyvanse may harm your unborn baby.
  • If you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. Do not breastfeed while taking Vyvanse. Talk to your doctor about the best way to feed your baby if you take Vyvanse.

What are possible side effects of Vyvanse?

The most common side effects of Vyvanse reported in studies of adults with moderate to severe B.E.D. include:

    • dry mouth
    • trouble sleeping
    • decreased appetite
    • increased heart rate
    • constipation
    • feeling jittery
    • anxiety

Please see Important Safety Information. Be sure to talk to your doctor about any side effects that are bothersome or do not go away.

These are not all the possible side effects of Vyvanse. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist.


  • if you or your child are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Vyvanse may harm your unborn baby.
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IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Vyvanse® is a federally controlled substance (CII) because it can be abused or lead to dependence. Keep Vyvanse in a safe place to prevent misuse and abuse. Selling or giving away Vyvanse may harm others and is against the law.

Vyvanse is a stimulant medicine. Tell the doctor if you or your child have ever abused or been dependent on alcohol, prescription medicines, or street drugs.

Who should not take Vyvanse?

Do not take Vyvanse if you or your child are:

  • taking or has taken an anti-depression medicine called a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) within the past 14 days.
  • sensitive or allergic to, or had a reaction to other stimulant medicines.

Problems that can occur while taking Vyvanse. Tell the doctor:

  • if you or your child have heart problems or heart defects, high blood pressure, or a family history of these problems. This is important because sudden death has occurred in people with heart problems or defects taking stimulant medicines, and sudden death, stroke and heart attack have happened in adults taking stimulant medicines. Since increases in blood pressure and heart rate may occur, the doctor should regularly check these during treatment. Call the doctor right away if you or your child have any signs of heart problems such as chest pain, shortness of breath, or fainting while taking Vyvanse.
  • if you or your child have mental problems, or a family history of suicide, bipolar illness, or depression. This is important because new or worsening behavior and thought problems or bipolar illness may occur. New symptoms such as seeing or hearing things that are not real, believing things that are not true, being suspicious, or having new manic symptoms may occur. Call the doctor right away if there are any new or worsening mental symptoms during treatment.
  • if you or your child have circulation problems in fingers and toes (peripheral vasculopathy, including Raynaud’s phenomenon). Fingers or toes may feel numb, cool, painful, sensitive to temperature and/or change color from pale, to blue, to red. Call the doctor right away if any signs of unexplained wounds appear on fingers or toes while taking Vyvanse.
  • if your child is having slowing of growth (height and weight); Vyvanse may cause this serious side effect. Your child should have his or her height and weight checked often while taking Vyvanse. The doctor may stop treatment if a problem is found during these check-ups.
  • if you or your child are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Vyvanse may harm your unborn baby.
  • if you or your child are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. Do not breastfeed while taking Vyvanse. Talk to your doctor about the best way to feed your baby if you take Vyvanse.

What are possible side effects of Vyvanse?

The most common side effects of Vyvanse reported in ADHD studies include:

    • anxiety
    • decreased appetite
    • diarrhea
    • dizziness
    • dry mouth
    • irritability
    • loss of appetite
    • nausea
    • trouble sleeping
    • upper stomach pain
    • vomiting
    • weight loss

The most common side effects of Vyvanse reported in adults with moderate to severe BED include:

    • dry mouth
    • trouble sleeping
    • decreased appetite
    • increased heart rate
    • constipation
    • feeling jittery
    • anxiety

What is Vyvanse?

Vyvanse® (lisdexamfetamine dimesylate) is a prescription medicine used for the treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in patients 6 years and above, and for the treatment of moderate to severe binge eating disorder (B.E.D.) in adults. Vyvanse is not for weight loss. It is not known if Vyvanse is safe and effective for the treatment of obesity.

For additional safety information, click here for Prescribing Information and Medication Guide and discuss with your doctor.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


  • if you or your child are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Vyvanse may harm your unborn baby.
  • if you or your child are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Vyvanse may harm your unborn baby.
  • if you or your child are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Vyvanse may harm your unborn baby.
  • if you or your child are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Vyvanse may harm your unborn baby.
  • if you or your child are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Vyvanse may harm your unborn baby.
  • if you or your child are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Vyvanse may harm your unborn baby.